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Context: I am teaching an online course via WA. The teaching and learning activity is going to take place in a WA group. In that course, I need to tell my students that they will get the materials on the group one after another. So, I will not send them all at once. I will just send one material right before we are engaged in it. Can I say: Well, class, I will send the material you are going to learn and it should be on your phone screen while you are having it

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    I will send you the material before each lesson, so that it can be on your screen during it. – Weather Vane Jun 11 '20 at 9:17
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    You probably want to substitute going to for gonna if you're writing to your class (I do understand that you may have just been referring to what you might say aloud). Gonna is often used when speaking, but it's not a generally accepted written form. – Isabel Archer Jun 11 '20 at 9:34
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    The phrases "about to learn" and "before you learn" are repetition of the same idea. I imagine that if you tell them you'll be sending the course material, they will understand what that means without explanation. So "I will send you the course material before each lesson" is all you need to say. Similarly if you are having a tea party, and say "I'll bring some cups" you don't have to explain "so that you have something to drink from." – Weather Vane Jun 11 '20 at 9:44
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    Perhaps "student" will work? – Weather Vane Jun 11 '20 at 9:58
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    Please ask a new question. – Weather Vane Jun 11 '20 at 10:02