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I found the following phrase in the wild and as an ESL speaker it piqued my interest:

So people who become Social Media influencers can get lucrative deals with companies why?

What's up with the adverb "why" put at the end? My hunch is that it is a colloquial contraction of a sentence and a sentence fragment:

*So people who become Social Media influencers can get lucrative deals with companies. Why?

My questions:

  • Is my hunch correct?
  • Is there a name for this specific phenomenon in linguistics?
  • Does this phrasing convey a specific connotation?
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  • Please give an easier-to-pinpoint link. // Are you assuming that anything you find on the internet must be error-free? It's rare for even competent native speakers to score 100% on tests. Isn't this likely just to be sloppy writing or reproduction? Jun 10 '20 at 15:57
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    Someone there was too lazy to put a full stop and a capital letter. The name for this specific phenomenon is negligence.
    – Yellow Sky
    Jun 10 '20 at 16:00
  • @Araucaria-Nothereanymore that’s interesting! Care to formulate this as an answer?
    – DBK
    Jun 10 '20 at 20:05
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It's a simple reordering:

So why do people who become Social Media influencers get lucrative deals with companies?

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  • 2
    But where did the "do" come from?
    – Hellion
    Jun 10 '20 at 19:26
  • @Araucaria-Nothereanymore. Somebody kicked the can!
    – Hot Licks
    Jun 10 '20 at 22:32
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    It seems to me that it is not just a reordering. It is a reordering that typically expresses rhetorical incredulity or condemnation. "So criminals are being early-released why?"
    – Steve
    Jun 11 '20 at 17:25
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Hot Licks' simple reordering is correct. The original sequence would also be grammatically correct if "why" was shown as a separate interrogatory sentence: "So people who become Social Media influencers can get lucrative deals with companies. Why?"

But that improved version still doesn't resolve some stylistic problems. "So people who become" and "can" are redundant. "Social media" is probably not a proper noun phrase and shouldn't be capitalized. A more parsimonious construction would express the same thought with fewer words: "Why do social media influencers get lucrative deals with companies?"

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