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What is a general word used to describe a celestial body such as a planet, moon, star, meteor, etc.?

I’m looking for a informal word to fill in the blank in this sentence:

This shuttle is smaller, designed to seat only the six questers, can move a lot faster, and has features specifically designed for unexplored ________<

I don’t want to get too specific and list out all the different types of space rocks the characters might end up on, but I also don’t want to use a technical term that might alienate the readers.

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    Maybe consider a different approach like describing these in some other context-related way. (Like, "unexplored destinations that the questers might encounter."
    – Jonathan
    Jun 7 '20 at 6:22
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    In the first episode of Cosmos(1980), Carl Sagan compares the Universe to an ‘ocean’, and the deep space to its unexplored waters. You could think of a similar analogy.
    – user358018
    Jun 7 '20 at 8:24
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    What's wrong with using celestial body? It seems very appropriate. Why do you have to use a single word? Jun 7 '20 at 13:30
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    The only downside of using celestial body is that celestial is associated with looking at the heavens from Earth, which arguably makes it less than apt if one is speaking of these bodies as something one may travel to and land on.
    – jsw29
    Jun 7 '20 at 16:03
  • Space objects seems to be a popular term if you use a search engine.
    – Greybeard
    Jun 7 '20 at 16:57
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This shuttle is smaller, designed to seat only the six questers, can move a lot faster, and has features specifically designed for unexplored horizons.

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How about frontiers? From Lexido:

frontier: The extreme limit of understanding or achievement in a particular area.

Your example:

This shuttle is smaller, designed to seat only the six questers, can move a lot faster, and has features specifically designed for unexplored frontiers.

Not too specific and not too technical, but encompasses all manner of celestial bodies and phenomena. Good enough for decades of Star Trek. In your example, I might say something more like "designed to explore new frontiers".

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