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I am wondering if one could use if and whether in the same phrase or whether it is better to use two identical conjunctions.

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    You just did use if and whether in the same phrase (twice in fact), and it made sense (both times) … – Jason Bassford Jun 3 '20 at 9:27
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    As personal preference, in this circumstance, I would be inclined to use the two different conjunctions, to avoid repetition. – Christina Hall Jun 3 '20 at 9:45
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    There's nothing wrong with that, however you should be aware of the difference between them. – Lucian Sava Jun 3 '20 at 10:38
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    If the R number comes below 0.5, and if hospitals seem to be coping well, the Government will relax the quarantine rule. // Whether we go or whether we stay won't make a great deal of difference. //// The answer depends largely on the sentence in question, and partly on the formality level required. Like @Christina, I'd use your version, here, though with major tweaks. I'd class if and whether here as complementisers, for a start. And replace 'phrase'. – Edwin Ashworth Jun 3 '20 at 11:19
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    A phrase refers typically to a grouping of words which typically do not contain a subject or verb. What you are calling a phrase is in actual fact a clause which typically contains a subject and a verb. – Christina Hall Jun 3 '20 at 11:31

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