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I was reading a poem in which the following expression is contained: "I'd be sugar teeth".

I tried to look for the right translation of this, but I couldn't find anything. I only saw on Urban Dictionary that "sugar tooth" means to be thirsty/horny. But it seems to me one of those fixed expressions that do not work when pluralized.

I've also seen that in music there are some things (bands, songs) named Sugar Teeth. Do you have any idea of what it could be its meaning, also in that sentence?

  • Looking up "sugar teeth" in a Google search gave only 20 000 results; I gave up looking for hits that weren't false positives after the first five pages: zero (I've discounted the UD reference and lyrics / group names). I'd say that puts this in the non-standard-usage category, so off-topic. – Edwin Ashworth May 21 at 10:58
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"Sugar teeth" are teeth damaged by sugar. In that sense it could imply 'having been damaged by something you love and can't get enough of'.

It also reminds me of the expression 'to have a sweet tooth', meaning you like or have a craving for sweet things.
Urban Dictionary's definition of "sugar tooth" is also what you refer to in your post (opposed to "sugar teeth", which you imply), where a craving for something sweet is generalized to a craving for something you can't get enough of, or for something tantalizing.

The meaning of "I'd be sugar teeth" is likely to be found in the overlapping area: 'a desire for something detrimental'.

I'll assume you are referring to this poem, "If I Could, I Would Have Named Myself Honeysuckle", by Robin Gow. In it, the author refers to the intrinsic danger of the beautiful eponymous flower: the presence of ticks as an invisible threat on an otherwise innocent and surrendering entity.
I think the author yearns for that wild, uncontrollable state, simultaneously embodying both the sweet and its detriment.

(I also found this blog post (warning: very explicit content!), where - similarly - "sugar teeth" is a literal combination of 'sugar' and 'teeth', but both in a metaphorical sense: 'sweet, innocent' and 'biting, raw, feral', respectively. This is remarkably similar to my interpretation of the meaning in the poem.)

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    OP is asking about whether 'sugar teeth' is an idiomatic variant of 'sugar tooth'. 'The meaning of ' "I'd be sugar teeth" is likely to be found in the overlapping area' is merely unsubstantiated opinion, and a single example on a blog post doesn't argue well for idiomaticity. – Edwin Ashworth May 21 at 10:49
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    @EdwinAshworth OP doesn't: title is "Sugar teeth meaning", question is "Do you have any idea of what it could be its meaning, also in that sentence?". I had an idea, which I wrote down. It is certainly an opinionated idea, but not without substance. Moreover, I give two examples where the same opinionated idea based on my inference seems a fitting interpretation. – Joachim May 21 at 11:03
  • Looking up "sugar teeth" in a Google search gave only 20 000 results; I gave up looking for hits that weren't false positives after the first five pages: zero (I've discounted the UD reference and lyrics / group names, rationales for naming being off-topic on ELU.) I'd say that puts this in the non-standard-usage category, so off-topic. Suggestions for the meanings of non-standard usages, merely unsubstantiated opinions, are as I've said not what ELU desires in answers. Please check this at the Help Center. – Edwin Ashworth May 21 at 13:43
  • @EdwinAshworth So I shouldn't have answered in the first place? Do you want me to delete the answer, so this question can be cleaned up more easily? – Joachim May 21 at 16:15
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    The comments tend to stick around longer than some anticipate, so, apart from the clutter, the major problem is dealt with. The trouble with opinion-based / underresearched 'answers' being given to dubious questions is that they encourage more of the same. Please look through the advice at the Help Center, for next time. – Edwin Ashworth May 21 at 16:22

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