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The laws in our country that restrict our freedoms are not legislated by evil politicians.

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If you used the plural, and somebody then asked you 'Which freedoms do you have in mind?', would you be able to answer the question right away? If you would (for example, by saying 'the freedoms enumerated in the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution'), then your use of the plural is justified. If you are not prepared to answer such a question, you should use the singular.

In other words, freedom is primarily a mass noun. One can sometimes use it as a countable noun, but so using it presupposes a reference to some countable legal provisions (or something similar) that specify different freedoms (different kinds of freedom).

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Plural freedoms is fine.

Compare this usage:

The First Amendment guarantees freedoms concerning religion, expression, assembly, and the right to petition.

Source: Legal Information Institute

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It depends on what you're going for.

If you were to write "freedom," it would be synonymous with "liberty," which is a general concept:

The laws in our country that restrict our freedom are not legislated by evil politicians.

The laws in our country that restrict our liberty are not legislated by evil politicians.

If the laws aren't letting citizens do what another law or document (like the Constitution of the United States, for example) allows them to do, then you would write "freedoms," which would be synonymous with "rights":

The laws in our country that restrict our freedoms are not legislated by evil politicians.

The laws in our country that restrict our rights are not legislated by evil politicians.

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