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If I am embedding a quote in a paragraph such as:

Thomas, a scientist, said ‘’I wish I had access to more samples’’

Should I put a full stop inside the quotation marks as well as outside if it’s at the end of a sentence and I am to continue with the paragraph after this sentence?

Which is correct?

Thomas, a scientist, said ‘’I wish I had access to more samples.’’. Thomas has been working hard with a team of scientists to find a cure.

Or

Thomas, a scientist, said ‘’I wish I had access to more samples.’’ Thomas has been working hard with a team of scientists to find a cure.

Which one would be correct in accordance to the rules of British English?

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    Does this answer your question? How much punctuation is appropriate when ending a sentence with a full-sentence quotation? I'm quite prepared to double-punctuate where I think it's necessary for clarity. With spoken words, there was no full stop when the words were spoken, so a single full stop should be necessary to show the end of the quote-and-sentence, essentially doing double duty. Often in the UK, this will be inside the inverted commas, after the quote. Commented May 19, 2020 at 14:40
  • In the context of your Question, 'Thomas said ‘’I wish I had access to more samples.’’ Thomas has (anything)…' would be correct in accordance with the rules of English, anywhere. That looks like a contrived example. In other circumstances it might - as Edwin hints above - be appropriate to use one stop in- and another outside the quotation marks… and as so often, circumstances alter cases. Commented May 19, 2020 at 19:30

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