1

I know about comparison in positive forms:

  1. I like movies as much as you do.

  2. I like movies not so much as I do TV shows.

But is it possible to do the above in negative forms?

  1. I don't like movies as much as you don't like them.

  2. I don't like movies not so much as I don't like TV shows.

  • 1
    There are excessive negatives in 3 and 4. English usually avoids excessive negatives because they become incomprehensible, e.g. “It would not be wrong to fail to not deny that it were not false that I don't like movies as much as you don't like them.” – Greybeard May 19 at 11:15
  • Shortly, no, it isn't. Might you get more support somewhere like SE English Language Learners? – Robbie Goodwin May 19 at 19:58
3

(1) is fine, but (2) needs to be in this form:

I don't like movies as much as I do TV shows.

or I like movies, but not as much as I do TV shows.

You can say I don't like movies as much as you [do],

but if you want to make both parties' opinions negative, you have to use dislike *(or a synonym of it).

(3) I dislike movies as much as you do.

(4) I dislike movies, but not as much as I do TV shows.

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