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Mr Mosley is not listed on the company's most recent documents filed to Companies House, which name as directors the former Foreign Office advisor Sir Daniel Bethlehem, who is understood to have an independent role overlooking corporate governance, and Alexander Carp, Palantir's chief executive.

The part "which name as directors" sounds grammatically wrong to me. Can anyone explain what does it mean if there is no syntax error?

I am interpreting as "which name former Foreign Office advisor Sir Daniel Bethlehem as directors"(?) And if that's the case what rule does it fall under?

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"Which" is a pronoun used to introduce a relative clause and refers most often to things. (Merriam-Webster). In this case, the things are "documents". The verb form to use with the plural noun "documents" is "name". ...the company's most recent documents...which name...

Regarding your second question, the documents name not just one person, but two, as directors: Sir Daniel Bethlehem and Alexander Carp. So the use of the plural "directors" is correct.

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  • thanks @Isabel that really helps to clear the confusion! I still have one question. So the placement of "which" does not always refer to the object before it(i.e in this case Companies House)? – kitcat May 18 at 10:03
  • also one more question why can "as directors" appear at the front not at the back of the sentence? and what grammar rule does it fall under? – kitcat May 18 at 10:05
  • @kitcat, that's right. "Filed to Companies House" is a descriptive phrase that applies to "documents", and "which" refers to documents". "Documents" doesn't have to precede "which" immediately. – Isabel Archer May 18 at 10:12
  • You could put "as directors" at the end of the sentence, but by the time you finished talking about the two directors and their titles, the link between "name" and "as directors" might get lost. It's clearer and more efficient to put "as directors" next to the verb. Doing that also allows readers to understand in what context the two people are being discussed before they read the information about them. The phrase could very well read "as custodians" or "as purveyors", and you wouldn't know that until the end of the sentence if the phrase weren't next to the verb. – Isabel Archer May 18 at 10:14
  • @kitcat: as directors can be moved by heavy clause extraposition – Colin Fine May 18 at 12:22
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The sentence is “Mr Mosley is not listed on the documents.” The rest of the sentence is comprised of a non-defining description of the documents and their contents.

Mr Mosley is not listed on **{**the company's most recent documents

[which [=the documents] were] filed to Companies House,

[and] which [the documents] name, comma as directors, comma

the former Foreign Office advisor Sir Daniel Bethlehem,

who is understood to have an independent role overlooking corporate governance,

and

Alexander Carp,

Palantir's chief executive.}

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