1

I am having a problem in understanding this sentence:

I can understand being deceived into thinking it's a joke.

Does it mean that the speaker is being deceived into thinking like that or he (the speaker) thinks that someone is being deceived into thinking like that. I mean does it mean:

I can understand I am being deceived into thinking it's a joke.

Or

I can understand someone is being deceived into thinking it's a joke.

Actually, I have read that the continuous(present,past,future) passive voice structure is like this: sub+helping verb+being+ past participle+preposition+object, but here, the (sub and helping verb) part is missing and I want to know the reason. Please explain it to me.

TIA

2
  • 1
    It could mean the introspective 'I can understand my being deceived into thinking it's a joke' [',can't you?'], obviously when one has realised / been informed that it is not a joke. But 'I can understand Tom, Dick and Harry [say] being deceived into thinking it's a joke' is far more likely: 'People are often so gullible. I can understand being deceived into thinking it's a joke. Especially with such a manipulative conman.' May 14, 2020 at 13:48
  • Thanks Edwin 😇 May 14, 2020 at 14:00

1 Answer 1

-1

I The second choice is the proper one, bar a small difference.

  • I can understand there is the possibility of being deceived into thinking it's a joke.

II It's just a gerund; it functions as a noun (head of a noun phrase, (ref.)) the use is as in this example.

  • I understand wanting to work on large projects with lots of smart people from around the world. I understand wanting to get recognition for that work.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.