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Is there a word that implies that a person is educated and ignorant at the same time?

I tried ignorant, ignoramus and similar words but they imply that a person is uneducated and does not convey the sense of educated and ignorant. I searched up synonyms of ignorant and ignoramus but did not find the word I need.

In my native language we have a word which means "educated idiot." Is there any word for that? Thanks.

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I suggest morosoph.

Morosoph or morosophist (noun): a learned fool

History and Etymology for morosoph: morosoph from obsolete French morosophe, from Greek mōrosophos, from mōros dull, stupid + sophos wise; morosophist from obsolete French morosophe + English -ist — M-W

Also,

Morosoph: a wise fool

Origin: Late 17th century; earliest use found in Thomas Urquhart (1611–1660), author and translator. From Middle French morosophe wise fool (Rabelais, 1546) from post-classical Latin morosophus wise fool from Hellenistic Greek μωρόσοϕος foolishly wise, wise fool (2nd cent. a.d.) from ancient Greek μωρός foolish + σοϕός wise. Cf earlier morosophist — Lexico

Don't expect all your listeners to understand what you mean by 'morosoph'.


From Greybeard's comment:

It’s an interesting word. The OED gives morosoph, n. Brit. /ˈmɔːrəˌsɒf/, U.S. /ˈmɔrəˌsɑf/ Etymology: < Middle French morosophe wise fool (*Rabelais, 1546)... Now rare. (a) A wise fool, a jester. (b) A foolish pedant or would-be philosopher; = morosophist n. ++ For *morosophist, OED gives the same definition and adds “obsolete.rare”. It seems last to have been used seriously in 1835, although there is one use in 1990 in an academic essay about the comparative styles of Grimmelhausen and Rabelais in relation to the original morosophe, Simplicius.

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    It’s an interesting word. The OED gives morosoph, n. Brit. /ˈmɔːrəˌsɒf/, U.S. /ˈmɔrəˌsɑf/ Etymology: < Middle French morosophe wise fool (*Rabelais, 1546)... Now rare. (a) A wise fool, a jester. (b) A foolish pedant or would-be philosopher; = morosophist n. ++ For *morosophist, OED gives the same definition and adds “obsolete.rare”. It seems last to have been used seriously in 1835, although there is one use in 1990 in an academic essay about the comparative styles of Grimmelhausen and Rabelais in relation to the original morosophe, Simplicius. – Greybeard May 8 '20 at 8:43
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    That's probably because it's marked as "Obsolete.rare."OED: 1610 Histriomastix ii. 56 That..I may..leave this Idle contemplation To rugged Stoicall Morosophists. // 1798 T. J. Mathias Pursuits of Lit.: Pt. IV (ed. 5) 284 *Some Morosophists of the Society. // 1870 K. H. Digby Halcyon Hours 255 Morosophists who love to boast Are those of course who scorn the most This holy maid. – Greybeard May 8 '20 at 8:50
  • @mohsin raza - a word which means "educated idiot." - I don't think there is one word - it depends on why the person is like that and the impression they give: Is he a genius pretending to be stupid - a joker? Is he stupid but pretending to be clever - an idiot? Is he generally stupid but occasionally has genius thoughts? Is he naturally clever but very uneducated? Is he very well educated but totally impractical? Etc. – Greybeard May 8 '20 at 9:11
  • There is the absent-minded professor, who is highly educated yet forgetful or impractical. – Yosef Baskin May 8 '20 at 12:52

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