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What is a good metaphor for a person that is creative, or for creativity in general? I find nothing when searching and nothing really comes to my mind? Help appreciated!

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Analogy

Analogy is the broader term for metaphors and similes. Pick an aspect of 'creativeness' that you want to emphasize and find a suitable analogy. If it's originality, or ingenuity, or free-association, or the ability to constantly produce, any of these might be analogous to some other well-known thing (a garden, a factory, a waterfall, a flock of sparrows) and by making the analogy you emphasize that aspect even though these things aren't normally associated.

Metonym

Metonym is an associative concept, like "Wall Street" (an actual street in New York's financial district) standing for the stock market and the industry that surrounds it. Similarly, "Hollywood" stands for the movie industry and movies in general, as well as being an actual place where film studios were located.

Synecdoche

synecdoche is when a part represents the whole (or vice-versa) so an artist has "an eye", a musician has "an ear", a dancer has "legs". These are specific things they use in their craft but they stand for broader concepts than what the word actually means. A hitman might be "a hired gun", and an attractive woman might be "a skirt".

Literary philosopher Kenneth Burke grouped 1 more language "trope" with these: Irony. It would probably be used to represent the idea in a negative way, but possibly revealing some underlying 'truth'. The irony of creativity might be some of the negative aspects of art and artists such as an unreliable work ethic, crippling self-doubt, disregarding of morals or society's norms, or inconsistent results.

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Really depends on context but "A five year old when it comes to creativity" might work. The only problem is if the person you are trying to describe is 5 years old.

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  • For me that example doesn't work at all. I'm sort of guessing you mean that five-year-olds are very creative (mostly because that's what the OP asked for), but the sentence could just as well mean the opposite (comparing someone to a young child usually implies a lack of growth/skills/etc). Like I said, I'm aware that you probably mean the former, but the very fact that it's ambiguous makes it a bad metaphor.
    – Llewellyn
    May 3, 2020 at 18:20
  • @Llewellyn young kids are much more creative than adults. As far as I know, the stereotype is that they never run out of ideas. The lack of growth/skills that you mention is the lack of practicality, or the lack of ability to make their imagination into reality, but tht in itself is not a lack of creativity.
    – Ankit
    May 3, 2020 at 18:27
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"[persons name] is Leonardo da Vinci in terms of creativeness", came up with this.

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  • This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. - From Review
    – erikric
    May 6, 2020 at 10:17
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How about font of ideas? From M-W:

font: a point or place at which something is invented or provided // a domestic diva who is a seemingly endless font of new ideas

A commonly-used metaphor for a creative person.

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