1

For example, "you have hyperinflation in both your lungs, which is in favor of asthma." Or "you have hyperinflation in both your lungs, which is suspected asthma." Do these sounds natural? If not, what does?

Thanks

1
  • There are differences among (a) X provides some (but possibly weak) evidence of 'in favor of' Y, (b) X provides enough evidence to suspect Y (enough evidence to make it worthwhile to investigate the matter), and (c) X provides enough evidence to make Y probable (i.e. more like than not). The body of this question seems to be about (a) and (b), while its title is about (c).
    – jsw29
    May 9, 2020 at 16:06

1 Answer 1

1

Neither sounds natural. The natural expressions are:

a) "be symptomatic of" - A fever's refusal to respond to antibiotics is symptomatic of a viral infection.

b) "be indicative of" - A fever's refusal to respond to antibiotics is indicative of a viral infection.

Of the two, the former is slightly more precise and formal.

Compare the Farlex medical dictionary:

symptomatic indication - "An indication provided by the symptoms of a disease rather than because of precise knowledge of the actual disease process. For example, a patient may be given acetaminophen without knowing the cause of the symptoms of headache or fever."

To use your example, the sentences would be:

"You have hyperinflation in both your lungs, which is symptomatic of asthma."

"You have hyperinflation in both your lungs, which is indicative of asthma."

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy