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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcaWkR4ydeY

Hi, This is a British pronunciation according to the title. I can hear a rhotic /ɝ/ in the second syllable, however.

In the pronunciation of this word, there's almost no difference between British English and American English?

Can you tell is it British English or American English only from the voice of this word?

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  • It's British pronunciation, not because of the rhotic sound or lack thereof in that video, but because of the high rising terminal.
    – Double U
    May 4, 2020 at 15:27
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    Definitely British. No way it's RP; southern, yes. It's a kind of Estuary with a hint of West Country. May 4, 2020 at 19:02
  • @Michael Harvey I'm afraid you won't make a Professor Henry Higgins! :) The accent is East Midlands... It says so in the comments below the video...
    – Greybeard
    May 4, 2020 at 20:31
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    There are no comments; the Collins caption says 'English Midlands', it's wrong (I spent my childhood in Derby, where my father was born). May 4, 2020 at 21:45

1 Answer 1

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Hi, This is a British pronunciation according to the title. I can hear a rhotic /ɝ/ in the second syllable, however.

The word in question is generation. Non-rhoticity does not affect /r/s that are followed by another vowel, as happens in that word (see Wiki).

Can you tell is it British English or American English only from the voice of this word?

Yes, probably, but only because of differences in vowel quality, not because of anything related to rhoticity.

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    OP's point is that we don't usually see r-coloured vowels in non-rhotic English. As it goes this is an overgeneralisation, because we occasionally have syllabic /r/ in RP/SSBE/GB. However, this is not one of those instances! OP has merely misheard. There's no [ɝ] in the second syllable at all. Nov 17, 2023 at 10:58

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