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The context of what I am looking for is:

However, after a similar transformation to the one performed before, the discreteness of the metric values was still present. This was also true for the spinal cord metric distribution in Figure 3.

I am trying to convey that the discreness of the metric values was also present in the spinal cord metric distribution after applying the transformation.

This is part of a Master's thesis. Using "This was also true.."/"The same thing happened with.."/"Similar thing happened with.." sounds quite informal to me, and they might not even convey too well what I am trying to say. Could anyone provide any suggestions of a more appropiate phrase? If you think I am wrong in thinking I should not use any of my examples please feel free to point it out!

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    Not may. Does. “as is the case for” as well as “holds for” are possibles. – Xanne May 1 at 18:04
  • Consider "also true of" – Casey May 1 at 22:26
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    The referent of 'this' being true is unclear. the discreteness of the metric values was still present. or after a similar transformation to the one performed before, the discreteness of the metric values was still present. – Edwin Ashworth May 2 at 13:39
  • Yea I realised that. I ended up writing However, after similar trimmings to the ones performed before, the discreteness of the metric values was still present. Trimming the right parotid metric distribution in Figure 3 also led to similar discreteness. – Luismi98 May 2 at 16:54
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The same is valid for/is applicable to/holds true for/applies to...

In context, "holds true for" sounds like a better fit.

To be or remain true, valid, or applicable.

  • The law must hold true for every person in society, not just those who earn the most money.
  • The same holds true today, even with all the recent technological advancements we've made.

TFD

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Simple '..., which was also true for...' will suffice, I think. I'm not sure about the verb 'happen' in this context, though. Your choice is not informal - in my non-native speaker ear, at least. It is neutral.

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  • Please check at the Help Center as to what sort of answers are expected on ELU. Note that the above answer adds an attributed link to a dictionary. Also, general writing advice (which styles are appropriate in which genres) is largely off-topic on ELU. – Edwin Ashworth May 1 at 18:54
  • @EdwinAshworth Thank you for the advice. However, Luismi asked precisely to point it out if anyone thinks he is wrong in thinking he should not use any of his examples. Which I humbly did. My opinion is of course subjective and can be questioned but I do not see how any dictionary can be of use here. – Jules Cocovin May 1 at 19:08
  • If only subjective answers can be offered, the question is not suitable for ELU. Questions about optimal style belong on Writing (or a dedicated, eg scienc, site). Answers, however humble, encourage further off-topic questions. – Edwin Ashworth May 2 at 12:57
  • @EdwinAshworth I have edited out what I thought might be redundant. – Jules Cocovin May 2 at 13:22
  • Note how Xanne offers reasonable opinion in a comment above. Centaurus does offer reasonable alternatives, with an attributed link. But I've C-Vd as I feel this is essentially asking for writing / style advice rather than correct grammar. And I'm not sure that the referent of OP's bolded 'this' is really clear. – Edwin Ashworth May 2 at 13:36

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