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We would like John and _____ (you/yourself) to come to the party

Regarding the above sentence, I've done quite a fair bit of Googling and still haven't found a substantial and satisfactory explanation for this. I'm a native speaker of English, yet, I find this question nonetheless perplexing; I can't quite put my finger on it.



My arguments for 'you'

It's an objective pronoun. The example shown below seems grammatically correct and is commonplace in English.

I would like to see you here tomorrow.


My arguments for 'yourself'

The example shown below seems grammatically accurate as well.

You love yourself more than anyone else.

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  • Please help us decipher your title. What does "object pronounce" mean? How are "you" or "yourself" preceding a "primary object"?
    – Hot Licks
    Apr 30, 2020 at 1:46
  • Consider these related sentences: (We would like you to come to the party. (2) We would like John himself to come to the party. (3) We would like you yourself to come to the party. There's even this: (4) We would like John himself and you yourself to come to the party. Apr 30, 2020 at 1:52
  • You must mean pronouns. Apr 30, 2020 at 21:36
  • @HotLicks Sorry, that was a typo of "pronouns". May 2, 2020 at 8:50
  • @YosefBaskin Yes, I do. My apologies. Thank you! May 2, 2020 at 8:50

1 Answer 1

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In your example, yourself is being correctly used as a reflexive form (you love yourself).

If someone invites you to a party (with or without another person), the verb is not reflexive, so yourself is inappropriate.

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