-1

When someone has completed his/her Master of Arts. And I need to call him/her a non science guy while discussing a particular science topic (no offense).

Example

Rob, you are a ‘non science guy’ so it may take some time for you to understand what I am saying about it”

Is there any such term in english language? What would be appropriate alternative?

  • 4
    Liberal arts graduate. – Hot Licks Apr 29 at 21:20
  • 2
    Wouldn't you just say what his/her background is? The world is not divided into science and non-science; there are many different disciplines: humanities, engineering, fine arts, business management, and so on. – choster Apr 29 at 22:00
  • 1
    @SazzadHissainKhan Right, so what's wrong with saying You're an engineer, not a scientist or how much science did you study for your French literature degree? Do see the guidance for single word requests. How to describe humanities students in one word may also be of interest. – choster Apr 29 at 22:06
  • 1
    I'm afraid I don't understand what you are hoping for. There is no English word for all colors that are not red, either. Either you say someone is not red, or you say s/he is blue, yellow, green, etc. – choster Apr 29 at 22:45
  • 3
    You could simply say that he is a layman. This would normally mean just that he doesn't have a professional qualification in the subject being discussed. In the dialect usually termed "politically correct", the word would be "layperson". Whatever. merriam-webster.com/dictionary/layman. Regardless of our intellect and accomplishments, we are all laymen in many areas. – Isabel Archer Apr 30 at 0:17
3

You are of course considerate not to want to offend your conversation partner. But whatever word you use to replace "non-science guy", you'll be taking the curious approach of informing someone that you're going to say something that he won't understand. However you say it, this kind of suggestion implies that the listener is deficient in some respect.

Instead, you might try something like this, "This may all be a little arcane, so please stop me if you'd like for me to explain something I've said." In other words, you could call the subject you're discussing obscure, rather than calling the listener uninformed.

| improve this answer | |
2

You can refer to someone as "An MA" just like I could be called "An MPA" for my terminal degree. Since SE likes sources, the OED has this sense as definition #15 for "Master."

I suggest being more specific. If you don't want to be offensive, instead of saying what he/she isn't (a "science guy") emphasize what he/she is. For example, if this person has an MA in English literature, you could say "You're a Master of English Lit" or "You have a Masters in English Lit." If your point is to say that the person isn't an expert in a given field, you can say "You have a Masters in English Lit but this topic requires more experience with computational astrophysics."

| improve this answer | |
  • If I call him an MA it doesn’t focus the part of my expression “non science guy” instead it focuses the part of his own school. But I want to remind his lack of knowledge on science school. – Sazzad Hissain Khan Apr 29 at 21:37
  • 1
    So call him a non-science guy. – Xanne Apr 30 at 0:10
  • You are free to ask for help here while insisting that you "want to remind his lack of knowledge on science school." However, answers and comments here have offered elegant approaches for not adding strife -- not to your reputation and not to the world. You are shooting yourself in the foot, tripping over your own (I forget the word), when you open your conversation with an insult. – Yosef Baskin Apr 30 at 4:00
  • Yosef I mentioned in the post comments that in reality I might not use this word unless with very close friends and casually. I just tried to elucidate my intentions with an example. And of course in arguments and debate with close casual friends that situation is not unexpected. No ad hominem. – Sazzad Hissain Khan Apr 30 at 6:01
  • @Yosef Baskin cord? – Conrado May 4 at 1:04
1

I believe 'humanities' is your best bet. It is a general term for rigorous inquiry and academic pursuit that is not grounded in the natural sciences. Religion, philosophy, language, arts, music- I would throw in economics and political science, because these disciplines rest on human behavior, are driven by psychology and cultural norms. (The actual practice of hard sciences is too, but that's another matter). So the counterpoint to "science guy" might be one "from the humanities school" or "steeped in the humanities."

| improve this answer | |
0

I found the closest matching word is layman,

Laymen

a person who does not belong to a particular profession or who is not expert in some field

.. so far from Isabel's comment

You could simply say that he is a layman. This would normally mean just that he doesn't have a professional qualification in the subject being discussed. In the dialect usually termed "politically correct", the word would be "layperson". Whatever. merriam-webster.com/dictionary/layman. Regardless of our intellect and accomplishments, we are all laymen in many areas.

| improve this answer | |
  • @jsw29 but its the closest one as I mentioned. Updated the description with proper link. – Sazzad Hissain Khan May 4 at 1:11
  • It's a general term and not even closer than non-scientist. – Decapitated Soul May 4 at 5:16
  • Ok. Then better make an answer @DecapitatedSoul – Sazzad Hissain Khan May 4 at 6:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.