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1) A: Do you like cooking? B: I have to be cooking all days because of my kids.

-What is the nuance of "be ~ing" when compared with "I have to cook all days because of my kids"? When do you use the continuous aspect like that?

2) A: Can you throw away a Prada wallet like my wife? Lol B: Maybe she's trying to say something like "it's about time you get me to a new Prada?" A: Is that why she was bringing me to Louis Vuitton yesterday? And our anniversary just so happens to be at the end of the month? ;;

-Why did A use the continuous aspect? Can you explain it compared to "is that why she brought me to Louis Vuitton yesterday? When do you use the continuous aspect like that?

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I would never say "I have to be cooking every day/all days because of my kids."

The speaker is reporting an habitual/frequent/regular action. The simple form of the verb is used for this purpose [1]: "I have to cook every day because of my kids."

If you wish to emphasise the duration of an habitual/frequent/regular action. Then a time phrase is required:

"I have to spend time cooking every day because of my kids."

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uses_of_English_verb_forms#Simple_present

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  • Can I speak to you on the phone at 6.00pm? Answer - Certainly not at that time, I have to be cooking.
    – WS2
    Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 15:25
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To begin with there is an important periperal issue here.

Let me deal with that first. In this context "all days" is not idiomatic if you want to indicate it is something you do "every day" - "I have to be cooking every day" is better. It may be a good idea to edit your question. This will help focus your principal inquiry.

So far as your main question is concerned "I have to be cooking every day because of my kids" and "I have to cook every day because of my kids" are both idiomatic. Usually one would employ the second, but to bring special emphasis to the continuity of the experience someone might employ the first. It is also more idiomatic with some Indian speakers.

The same principles can be applied to example 2. Though, fe. other than Indian speakers would use "was bringing" in preference to "brought".

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  • I have to cook, and I have to be cooking differ at least slightly. The former is like, Oh, time is up; I have to cook for my kids, whereas the latter sounds like, it is her responsibility to routinely cook, as if someone expects her/him to do it. To a question, "What do you do at home?" one may answer desperately, "What to do; I have to be cooking all the day..."
    – Ram Pillai
    Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 10:35
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    @RamPillai That distinction would not be made in British English. Commented Apr 22, 2020 at 11:47

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