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I always thought that according to grammar "such" adjective should always be followed by a plural noun.For eg., Are more and more students getting oriented to social media more than ever? I am interested in such topics.

Can I also say "I am interested in such topic". Kindly guide me.

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    Such nonsense! At least it can be also followed by an uncountable noun. I think the issue is that a singular noun usually needs an article. Perhaps you are interested in such an item.. – Damila Apr 21 '20 at 5:25
  • She always used such words that her friends loved her. She gave such an answer that he didn't escaped from the scene. But, Such example(s) as Covid is horrible. Such instance(s) will only work against the common good. I think it works in both ways. – Ram Pillai Apr 21 '20 at 14:32
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    Consider this example from Merriam Webster: "Amazed that parents would tolerate such insolence from their teenaged children". – fev Jan 16 at 10:43
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    I've never seen a credible claim for such a thing. – Hot Licks Jan 16 at 14:06
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Some dictionaries treat such as an adjective, but it is more likely to be considered a determiner, a predeterminer, or a substitute for a pronoun. See https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/such

You can say:

I am interested in such topics. (not such topic)

She has such a beautiful voice.

Such people are interesting to me.

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  • "a determiner, a predeterminer" Indeed. It looks as if such + indefinite article is a determiner. One indication of this is that such demands a(n) if the noun is a singular count noun, and precludes any other determiner. We cannot have * such her voice. We cannot even have * such my interests -- this shows that the zero indefinite article occupies the determiner slot, and this is enough to preclude another determiner. – Rosie F Jan 16 at 7:53
  • Does not answer the actual question. In fact, hints strongly at the wrong answer (see fev's example). A non-count noun usage is neither singular nor plural (though almost all such are singular in form). – Edwin Ashworth Jan 16 at 19:48

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