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Would you use "of" or " for" in the next sentences:

1- To arrange a soft transition of the authority and not a sudden one.

2-To arrange a soft transition for the authority and not a sudden one.

I mean to allow the movement of power from some one to another.

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  • They mean different things (as is often the case with changing prepositions). Please have a look at the tag info. It would be helpful to edit your question to describe the situation your sentence refers to.
    – Andrew Leach
    Apr 18, 2020 at 8:56
  • You've added a definite article, which is not good. Power in your explanation doesn't have one; but both mentions of authority do. There is obviously a lot more to what you're writing than this fragment (neither 1 nor 2 are complete sentences). There isn't nearly enough context for your texts.
    – Andrew Leach
    Apr 18, 2020 at 9:40

1 Answer 1

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As the comments say, context is important.

1: We are moving the authority to sign checks from A to B; to arrange a soft transition of the authority...

2: We are proposing a re-organisation of the Valley Authority; to arrange a soft transition for the Authority...

It's a 'transition of' what's being transitioned, and a 'transition for' the agents affected by the transition.

PS: English being English, there are bound to be some exceptions.

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