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I have collected the following examples from a corpus:

(1) Ohio is of course a battleground state that made observers, indeed most observers say Donald Trump must have to win this election. But can he do it?

(2) I must have to save him at any cost.

(3) They must have to either modify their Torah values or divorce them from being a relevant factor in their lives.

(4) US Article III judges should be re-confirmed by the Senate every 7 years (and guaranteed a vote too, no filibusters) and must have to retire at 70.

(5) Under the high taxation that STATE must have to pay for these program.

(6) I've been thinking about being cool, I must have to admit!

(7) So, you must have to eat right, exercise to stay in shape.

(8) They must have to just stack, like, a hundred cars into those two spots.

Can you help me and explain to me what ’must have to’ means in these examples, please?

Thank you

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  • What kind of corpus has these unidiomatic or ungrammatical sentences?
    – Jim
    Apr 13 '20 at 3:38
  • english-corpora.org/coca Apr 13 '20 at 13:04
  • Your own examples belong to contexts very different from your quoted corpus. You should find more detailed help at ell.stackexchange.com Apr 22 '20 at 8:24
  • Since you're here: ignoring any other doubts about those examples: (1) Ohio is of course a battleground state that observers say Donald Trump must have to win this election… … Donald Trump must have Ohio in order to win… (5) Under the high taxation that State must have to pay for these program. … taxation State will need in order to pay for… (8) They must have to just stack, like, a hundred cars into those two spots. In all likelihood, they will need to stack… (2, 3, 4, 6 & 7) All straight choices: Either must… have to…. Never both. Apr 22 '20 at 8:47
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Must and have/has to often mean the same thing, so in many of your examples it seems to me redundant to use both.

'I must save him at any cost.'

'I have to save him at any cost.'

In your example (8), they must have to means they probably have to or it looks as though they have to, which is how I would use the phrase.

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  • Thank you for this very helpful comment! Apr 12 '20 at 17:09

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