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I'm a little confused about telling which of the three sentences below are correct:

1- why are you still awake in this late time?

2- why are you still awake at this late time?

3- why are you still awake until this late time?

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  • 1
    Number two is probably most idiomatic, though "Why are you still awake this late?" would be better.
    – Hot Licks
    Commented Apr 11, 2020 at 20:35
  • 2
    What are you doing still up? Shouldn’t you be in bed by now?
    – Jim
    Commented Apr 11, 2020 at 20:40
  • @HotLicks Thank you for the explanation
    – Mohamed kz
    Commented Apr 11, 2020 at 20:54
  • @Jim Thanks man ,really appreciate that.
    – Mohamed kz
    Commented Apr 11, 2020 at 20:55

1 Answer 1

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"Late time" is a combination that you find in science nowadays. It is sometimes found to express what you want to say in your sentence but not as often as "late hour" (ngram).

  • Why are you still awake at this late hour?

As mentioned by user John Lawler in the comments, you can also do away with the adjective "late" and say "Why are you still awake at this hour?"; that is saying the same thing.

You can say instead "this late time of (the) day/the morning/the year" (ngram) (also "this early time of (the) day/the morning/the year" for the opposite).

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  • Just plain at this hour? is good enough. If it's late, it's obvious to everybody already. Commented Apr 11, 2020 at 21:48
  • @JohnLawler Well, yes, that is an option… but some people choose to add "late". You can't force everyone to a such minimalist speech practices.
    – LPH
    Commented Apr 11, 2020 at 21:53
  • @JohnLawler @ LPH thank you a lot for the useful info.But do you guys think I can remove "at" as follow (Why are you still awake this hour).
    – Mohamed kz
    Commented Apr 13, 2020 at 9:41
  • @Mohamedkz In the books you find only "awwake at this hour":books.google.com/ngrams/… It seems to me also that I never heard it said that way (without "at"); I wouldn't say this sentence without the preposition.
    – LPH
    Commented Apr 13, 2020 at 13:26

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