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Could you help, please ? case genitive \ possessive

This exercise is mentioned on the book ( practical exercises in English ) EXERCISE IX.

Distinguish between the following:—

  1. The President's reception. The reception of the President.

I can understand it or it seems to me the first phrase can mean the President he himself who does the reception ( the focus is on him ) = the President is who welcomes and greeting them to his reception place. The second can mean people do a reception to the president ( the focus is on the reception )

  1. Mother's love. Love of mother.

This also the focus is on mother that she offers a lovely atmosphere to sons , relatives, husband etc... \ the second can implies love of others toward the mother.

The idea I explain here can be applicable to the rest examples.

  1. A sister's care. Care of a sister.
  2. A brother's picture. The picture of a brother.
  3. Clive's reception in London. The reception of Clive in London.
  4. Charles and Harry's toys. Charles's and Harry's toys.
  5. Let me tell you a story of Doctor Brown (Brown's).

What would you say ? Do you agree with me ? I see no other idea can illustrate what the author meant by "Distinguish between the following " Thank you in advance

Best wishes to all

Notes : I want the difference in meaning not to give a long description explaining how and why, I know the ( s possessive) can be confined to human, animals and sometimes special usage with things. second question : Can you deny that ( of construction ) is not used to express possession or to imply possession ?

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  • The genitive is an inflectional case of the noun marked by -'s (or just '). e.g. "the bride's father". But in "the father of the bride", the "of" is not a genitive case marker but a preposition, and the PP "of the bride" is simply a complement of "father". – BillJ Apr 2 '20 at 12:47
  • I want the difference in meaning not to give a long description explaining how and why, I know the ( s possessive) can be confined to human, animals and sometimes special usage with things. second question : Can you deny that ( of construction ) is not used to express possession or to imply possession ? – Mohammad Ahmad Apr 4 '20 at 10:06
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I will make an inference from the first example. Here the President's reception is a particular event or party held in honor of the President. Any honored person may have a 'Reception'. Stated the second way it is meant to be distinct from the event and refers to the actual action of welcoming or greeting the President. As in the comment the first is a general case and the second is phrased to be the specific case. You could say "Not only did I go to the President's reception but I actually got to meet him and welcome him to Washington".

'A Sister's care' refers to the care given by anyone's Sister, not just this one.

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I came to ask about a particular thing you answered me in another way

The genitive is an inflectional case of the noun marked by -'s (or just '). e.g. "the bride's father". But in "the father of the bride", the "of" is not a genitive case marker but a preposition, and the PP "of the bride" is simply a complement of "father". – BillJ 1 hour ago 1 Does this answer your question? Can one explain the different distributions of the Saxon and the analytic (Norman) (periphrastic, 'of') genitive – Edwin Ashworth 4

This I limitedly agree with Example lion's cage \ the cage of the lion isn't the same ? Is not both possessive ? what can imply (( the cage of lion )) ? Does it mean (( the cage of fox )) ? Here from Grammar Monister : The genitive case Possessive Case or Genitive Case? The "genitive case" is also called the "possessive case." The two terms are interchangeable, but "possessive case" is more common in English study. However, as this case does not always show possession, some grammarians like to make a distinction between the genitive case and the possessive case. For example:

Dan's bike
(No one would argue this is the genitive case and the possessive case. It is the bike of Dan. It is about possession.)
Children's songs
(This is not about possession. It's about songs for children. For this reason, some argue this is the genitive case and not the possessive case.)
Constable's paintings
(This is not about possession. It's about paintings by Constable. Some would argue this is the genitive case and not the possessive case.)   .......etc... 

https://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/genitive_case.htm


If I say the home of Lords \ The novel of the old man and sea \ and many examples like these I can add >>>>> Of course the last examples are not a possessive case, but a genitive >>> The same lesson we have in our Arabic language and I can compare Nothing you know and consider yourselves masters!

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lastly, here I found ( it is the what I said before ) >> +Explanation+.--The president's reception means the reception given by the president, but the reception of the president means the reception given to the president.

Higher Lessons in English (illustrated): A WORK ON ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND composition. By Alonzo Reed, Brainerd Kellogg Google books https://books.google.iq/books?id=MhJUCgAAQBAJ&pg=PT233&lpg=PT233&dq=possessive++President%27s+reception.&source=bl&ots=yWKoEyjk7n&sig=ACfU3U1rNLZwCaPqIHGCdLo5KagSQquWMA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjjy7z8yM7oAhUGAWMBHapOBPEQ6AEwCXoECA0QLQ#v=onepage&q=possessive%20%20President's%20reception.&f=false

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