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I have the following sentence:

" Case studies with changing number of buildings and changing peak powers of the PV systems"

My question is, wether I should get rid of one of the 'changing'. So basically it would be like this:

" Case studies with changing number of buildings and peak powers of the PV systems"

I'd appreciate every comment. Thanks in advance

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    Since the language is pretty technical ('peak powers of the PV systems', for instance), it's hard to say what is idiomatic here. However: firstly, 'Case studies with changing number of buildings and changing peak powers of the PV systems' is not a sentence (though that doesn't make it 'wrong'). Secondly, 'changing' can mean 'that we are changing' or 'that are changing'; 'Case studies looking at/involving the changing numbers of ...' or 'involving changing the numbers of ...' disambiguates. FWIW, I'd leave both changing's in: more cluttered, but probably clearer. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 27 at 11:20
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    Yes@EdwinAshworth; that way it won't confuse. – Ram Pillai Mar 27 at 12:21
  • Hi all, thanks for your comments. With changing I meand different. So there are many case studies of a residential area in a simulation. They buildings have different PV system peak powers (so the average PV peak power is changing from case study to case study) and the number of buildings is different for every case study. Some case studies have 20 buildings while others have 59 buildings etc. – PeterBe Mar 27 at 17:11
  • So you'd advice me to use two times 'changing'? – PeterBe Mar 27 at 18:40
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EDITS:

I have the following sentences: [Neither is a sentence.]

" Case studies with changing numbers of buildings and changing peak powers of the PV systems"

My question is, whether I should get rid of one of the 'changings'. So basically it would be like this:

" Case studies with changing numbers of buildings and peak powers of the PV systems"

I'd appreciate every comment. Thanks . [It's obviously in advance. We haven't anwered yet.]

COMMENTS:

Either phrase is fine. The first is a little less ambiguous, but the meaning is clear enough in the second. If it's a legal contract, use the first. Otherwise, you're fine leaving out the second changing.

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The second half of the sentence, which you omitted, might be better on its own. It might be helpful to the reader to break up these thoughts.

First thought

Several case studies change the number of buildings [1, 3, 5] while other case studies change the peak powers of the PV systems [2, 4, 5].

The first thought disambiguates the two classes of case studies. Adding references to the case studies would help the reader know which studies go with which class.

Second thought

This part was omitted in the OP's example. But the second though could continue with

The case studies in which the number of buildings were changed suggest...

The case studies in which the peak powers of the PV systems were changed recommend...

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