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I have the following sentence:

"The share of renewable energy in Germany was 35 % and thus higher than the one of Europe as a whole"

Would you rather use 'Europe as a whole' or only 'Europe'? The thing is that Germany is obviously in Europe and if I only wrote 'Europe' this might suggest (at least to me) that Germany and Europe are two different regions. But at the same time the current formulation sounds kind of strange for me. What is your take on that?


Follow-up question: What if I compare the two 'Germany' and 'Europe' in a paragraph but not in a sentence. I would like to write a sentece about Europe in that paragraph like this one "Nuclear energy was the main fuel for electricity in Europe ". Would you also use 'Europe as a whole' in this setence?

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    'Europe as a whole' is the correct choice here; as you say, Europe is a set of countries, and Germany a member of that set. Your sentence sounds nearly fine to me as it stands, though I'd substitute 'that' for 'the one'. Mar 22, 2020 at 18:57
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    It is well understaood that Germany is a part of Europe. There are three syntactic possibilities: '...in Europe', '...in Europe as a whole', and 'in the rest of Europe'. 'Germany' and 'Europe' are not parallel, so it is confusing to place them so. Then of the remaining two, it depends on what is meant, either Germany included in the calculation or not. Either way, plain old just 'Europe' is semantically incongruous. Is that what you're getting at?
    – Mitch
    Mar 22, 2020 at 21:48
  • Thanks for the answers. What if I compare the two 'Germany' and 'Europe' in a paragraph but not in a sentence. I would like to write a sentece about Europe in that paragraph the this one "Nuclear energy was the main fuel for electricity in Europe ". Would you also use 'Europe as a whole' in this setence?
    – PeterBe
    Mar 23, 2020 at 15:54
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    It might be clearer to write "the whole of Europe". The question as currently written gives us only two choices.
    – MSalters
    Mar 27, 2020 at 9:26
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    Can you elaborate on why 'the current formulation sounds kind of strange'? Also, the 'update' seems to be a separate question, and it might be more likely to get a response if posted as such.
    – jsw29
    Mar 28, 2020 at 17:56

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