1

I like the coat very much. —But can you afford such an expensive coat ____(on/ with) your pay? which option is right?

1
  • 3
    Either one works.
    – Hot Licks
    Mar 21 '20 at 12:10
1

I like the coat very much. —But can you afford such an expensive coat ____(on/ with) your pay? which option is right?

✤-----✤-----✤

It's certainly 'on'.

-But can you afford such an expensive coat on your pay/ salary?.

-I don't know how he can afford a new car on his salary. - Cambridge dictionary

Google Ngram Viewer shows 'afford on' but doesn't show 'afford with'.

4
  • If one was emphasising the largeness of the pay I think "with" would work. e.g. With his pay/income one might have expected him to buy a bigger house. "With" is perhaps more idiomatic in Britain. Prepositions change, more than anything else, as one crosses the pond.
    – WS2
    Mar 21 '20 at 8:01
  • many thanks, they are very helpful. Mar 21 '20 at 8:35
  • @DecapitatedSoul Your evidence? "On" is not something I would use here.
    – WS2
    Mar 21 '20 at 12:24
  • 1
    @DecapitatedSoul I certainly don't rely on Google as a guide to the English language.
    – WS2
    Mar 21 '20 at 12:31
2

Both are correct.

Speaking as an Australian, I can say that both of those sound correct to me; if there’s a regional difference between British and American English, we’ve evidently gotten the best of both worlds here.

I think there might be a small difference in meaning, though; “on your pay” is a bit more referring to your ranking on a formal pay scale -e.g. “on apprentice wages”, whereas “with your pay” might be referring to your physical payments “going to the bank with my pay in my pocket”.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.