1

Which of these makes better sense.

I can use something else from wood. - This one doesn't sound right, or does it?

I can use something different from wood. - Same as the former, but it sounds a bit better. Is it correct though?

The following all sound right enough, so I'll consider them as correct.

I can use something different than wood.

I can use something else than wood.

I can use something other than wood.

Please correct/improve my tags as I'm not sure what to call the aforementioned.

2

1/ I can use something else from wood.
This first one is not correct at all. A correct formulation is as follows.

I can use something else than wood.      ngram

2/ I can use something different from wood.
This second one is quite correct. It is the traditional form (British English) an it is used much more than the two more recent forms that follow.     ngram

  • I can use something different than wood.
  • I can use something different to wood.     

3/ I can use something other than wood.
This third form is correct.

1

There is this phrase, shown by Lexico as

other than
PHRASE

1.1 Differently or different from; otherwise than.
there is no suggestion that we are to take this other than literally

So your sentence can be

I can use something other than wood.

2
  • 1
    I should probably be using other than. But is else from a valid option? – John Mar 20 '20 at 11:40
  • 1
    With a shorter sentence: "I can use something else." – Weather Vane Mar 20 '20 at 11:42

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