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I've got two sentences:

And now I'll announce the winner of the competition.

And now I'm going to announce the winner of the competition.

In which sentence the structure is used more accurately? Are there any rules that would apply to this exact (or similar) situation?

I know the difference between will and going to in terms of spontaneous/planned actions, but I'm confused here.

Edit: This sentence is from an exercise used in an English Language Competition. The question prompt was "Decide whether the sentences are grammatically correct and try to correct the ones that are not."

The sentence in the exercise went

And now I'll announce a winner of the competition.

and in the keys the corrected answer provided was

And now I'm going to announce the winner of the competition.

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    In this case, both forms are 'accurate'. As Swan in Practical English Usage (page 218) says: "Will/shall and present forms (especially going to...) are often both possible in the same situation."
    – Shoe
    Mar 17, 2020 at 15:49
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    Does this answer your question? "going to" vs "will" Mar 17, 2020 at 15:53
  • @Shoe, but I saw this sentence in an exercise where the assignment was to correct the mistakes. And the sentence in the exercise went "And now I'll announce a winner of the competition", and in the keys the corrected answer provided was "And now I'm going to announce the winner of the competition.
    – Stacy
    Mar 17, 2020 at 15:54
  • Why was it corrected this way?
    – Stacy
    Mar 17, 2020 at 15:56
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    Exercise books are full of poorly-considered and wrongly-constructed exercises. They always assume there's only one possible correct answer and all other possibilities are wrong. They are not to be trusted. Mar 17, 2020 at 17:26

2 Answers 2

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The construction "going to" is very common in those situations where "about to" can also be used.

  1. The car's about to crash! --->It's going to crash! (YES)
    It will crash (YES but it has slightly less urgency.)

  2. I'm about to announce the winner ---> I'm going to announce the winner. (YES)
    I will announce the winner (YES but it has slightly less urgency)

  3. We arrived just as the movie was about to start ---> … just as the movie was going to start (YES)
    We arrived just as the movie [was] will start. (NO/UNGRAMMATICAL)

This usage to express urgency or say something is imminent, is common both in speech and in writing; the author of the exercise probably wanted to see if the reader/learner had understood this lesson.

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My guess would be that both are correct, but the bottom one is more appropriate to the situation.

"I will" does not mean that I will (in the near future), but simply that I will do so.

"I'm going to" suggests that I will do so soon.

However, the word "now" means immediately, or in the very near future, so both "now I will" and "now I'm going to" should have the same meaning because of the word "now"

I'm not entirely sure if the answer key is correct or not, but I have a feeling that in this case it is not.

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