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We integrated A, B, and C from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) PanCanAtlas project to classify aberrant pathway function (Mermel et al., 2011).

In this sentence, was C only from TCGA or was all of A,B,C from TCGA?

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    Unclear. The example given is ambiguous. It could mean only C is from TCGA or that all of A, B, and C are from TCGA. – R Mac Feb 24 at 5:40
  • Please post it as an answer. – Crispy13 Feb 24 at 6:21
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    Unless 'C from X' is a well-known or otherwise patently cohesive phrase, it is pragmatically unfelicitous to write << A, B, and C from X >> to mean << C from X, A and B >>. So 'I met with John, Sue, and the man from the council' works (in the UK at least), but 'I met with John, Sue, and Bill from the council' defaults to the other reading. – Edwin Ashworth Feb 24 at 12:38
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It is almost certain that the ambiguity:

  1. We integrated A, B, and {C from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)}

  2. We integrated {A, B, and C} from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)

will be resolved by the context when we know the origins of A, B and C

| improve this answer | |
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Unclear. The example given is ambiguous. It could mean only C is from TCGA or that all of A, B, and C are from TCGA.

| improve this answer | |

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