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Is it gramatically correct to call my classmate in a unibersity a unibersity coleague? Or is the term coleague used only for professional staff workers.

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  • Unibersity is not a word. Coleague is not a word. Then again, gramatically is not a word, either, so maybe it all cancels out in the end and the answer becomes a "yes". – RegDwigнt Feb 14 at 14:18
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Grammarly, yes. Semantically, I would say no, cause the first impression of the phrase to me is that you work, instead of studying, in the university and so does your mate. You can use "schoolmate" to describe it. "Colleague" is mostly used to describe someone who works in the same business or field.

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    When you write Grammarly do you mean to refer to a well-known software package, much referenced hereabout, or is that a form of the word I would write as grammatically ? – High Performance Mark Feb 14 at 9:17
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    We wouldn't use schoolmate of a university student in British English; we would say fellow student. – Kate Bunting Feb 14 at 9:58

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