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Examples

Take sentences like:

Because of her alcohol addiction, she spends an extra $20 on booze every day.

Due to her alcohol addiction, she spends an extra $20 on booze every day.

If it wasn't for her alcohol addiction, she wouldn't spend an extra $20 a day on booze.

Out of her alcohol addiction, she spends an extra $20 a day on booze.

I think all four are correct.

Moreover, I think the following is correct:

For therapeutical reasons, she spends an extra $20 a day.

What about the following?

Out of therapeutical reasons, she spends an extra $20 a day.

Question

Is out of … reasons an acceptable phrase?

If so, is it equivalent to other expressions of causality (because of, due to, for … reasons)?

Semantically? Stylistically?


Related but different questions:
Because of a reason vs for a reason
Can “due to” and “because of ” be used interchangeably?

  • "Out of" doesn't make sense here. You could say "Out of her weekly income of X dollars, she spends Y dollars on booze". (NB Booze is quite a slang term, so it depends on the context of your sentence whether it's appropriate or not.) – Kate Bunting Jan 25 at 9:48
  • You might be thinking of the phrase "out of concern for ..." – Barmar Jan 25 at 9:55
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    When using figures and the $ sign to write money amounts, you should place the dollar sign before the figures, with no space, like this: $20. – Michael Harvey Jan 25 at 12:58
  • Thanks @MichaelHarvey. I see you have professional experience. Do you, perhaps, know any reasons for this rule (be it only custom)? And is it the same for other currencies, especially €? – Cacambo Jan 25 at 13:10
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    In English, almost all currency symbols go before the amount. The Euro is the major exception. In non-English speaking countries it usually goes after the amount, and in English speaking countries it usually goes before the amount, however, neither style is mandatory and it is left up to the writer or editor to decide. – CJ Dennis Jan 26 at 9:24
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No, "out of" is not idiomatically used in the ways you show.

The closest I can think of is the phrase "out of concern for", as in:

Out of concern for her alcohol addiction, we didn't serve wine when we invited her to dinner.

This is used when describing an action taken to avoid harming someone else.

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