0

I think I have seen usages like below:

  • The book is good in that it shows you the different options that might result from your choices.
  • The media was clear in that they obviously despised the president.
  • The suggested method is more effective than previous ones in that it requires less resources and achieves the result more quickly.

Is this [adjective] + that ... usage correct? Under which grammatical topic does it go if it is?

  • 1
    There's nothing special about [adjective] in that. It's a normal use of "in that": merriam-webster.com/dictionary/in%20that. – Juhasz Jan 13 at 21:38
  • 1
    Please add actual linked examples. Are you sure you've got the second quote correct? The second example, using 'clear in that they' for 'clearly' is non-standard. – Edwin Ashworth Jan 14 at 16:15
1

I have a few suggestions for you, one for each of your sentences.

The book is good in that it shows you the different options that might result from your choices

Options is probably not the right word, since options and choices are too close in meaning. "In that" is fine, but you save a word by substituting because.

The media was clear in that they obviously despised the president.

Kind of wordy. Better would be "The media clearly despised the president."

The suggested method is more effective than previous ones in that it requires less resources and achieves the result more quickly.

Again, "in that" could be substituted with because. Fewer should replace less. Also, for better parallelism, perhaps "it requires fewer resources and achieves quicker results" works well.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.