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For an invite-only website I'm hosting, I'm currently looking for a good word for the person who vouches for the new user. The inviting user is really taking some responsibility for the new user, i.e. that they are a good match for the community etc. If the new one behaves badly, both can be kicked out again.

Think about an exclusive club where not everyone can or should be invited, but only people who are a good match. Somebody who invites somebody new, and guarantees that the match is a good one, is the person for who I'm looking a word for.

English is not my native language, but I'm pretty sure that "voucher" is not what one should use here.

So far we came up with "sponsor" or "bailer" as being the best words - or using the term "vouching user".

What would be best in such a case?

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    I agree with "sponsor". – GEdgar Jan 8 '20 at 14:01
  • "Sponser", or the more nebulous "reference". – Hot Licks Jan 8 '20 at 14:36
  • Sponsor sounds all right. What would be about "bailer"? Is that a known word? – Rüdiger Schulz Jan 8 '20 at 15:00
  • "Bailer" isn't an english word in the sense of "to stand bail for a prisoner". What is the German (I assume) word that you would use? Of the options, "Sponsor" is the best choice for someone who introduces another member to a club, "Guarantor" if they're responsible for the person's actions. – KrisW Jan 8 '20 at 15:37
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    deepl.com/translator#de/en/B%C3%BCrge = Guarantor. Even though I proposed "Guarantor" as an answer, I do think Sponsor is probably better in your context, but nobody seems to want to propose that as an answer... :/ – KrisW Jan 9 '20 at 11:00
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As an alternative to "a sponsor" as suggested by a commenter, which I do think is the best word for this situation, try

Guarantor

A guarantor is a person who guarantees something. In this case, they guarantee that the new person will behave in accordance with the rules of the club.

This word is most often seen in financial contexts to desribe someone who agrees to repay a loan if the original borrower defaults, but the general meaning is simply someone who will guarantee that a contract or promise is fulfilled.

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Since you mention that it is for a website, it is customary of most websites to use the simple word testimonials, under which, would be affirmations by users vouching for the authenticity of the website.

But since it is a word for a person you ask, I'd go with attestant, which essentially means:

someone who affirms or vouches for the correctness or truth or genuineness of something

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  • The vouching person is not meant to be saying anything about the website, but is inviting a new user and vouching for that new user's character. – Rüdiger Schulz Jan 8 '20 at 14:25
  • @RüdigerSchulz You mean a mediator? – Noaman Ali Jan 8 '20 at 14:29
  • I think that is not really hitting it. Think more about an exclusive club where not everyone can or should be invited, but only people who are a good match. Somebody who invites somebody new, and guarantees that the match is a good one, is the person for who I'm looking a word for. – Rüdiger Schulz Jan 8 '20 at 14:59
  • @RüdigerSchulz If you'd provided this example in the question, it'd have given a clearer idea. The question asked is far different from this explanation. – Noaman Ali Jan 8 '20 at 16:15
  • I'm sorry if that was not onbvious enough. I added the example to the question. – Rüdiger Schulz Jan 8 '20 at 16:55

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