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The sentence is: "When a static or dynamic function call FC is evaluated with respect to a static context SC and a dynamic context DC, the result is obtained as follows.". This sentence is quoted from 3.1.5.1 Evaluating Static and Dynamic Function Calls

I can't understand the verb "call", shouldn't it be used in the present tense "calling" here?

  • Why are you calling it a verb? It's a noun. Nouns don't have tense in English. – tchrist Dec 27 '19 at 1:49
  • This three nouns , "function", "call", "FC" , are serialized together?Why not using "calling" instead for better – cmf41013 Dec 27 '19 at 1:53
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    It's just a compound noun, like peanut butter and dog house. – tchrist Dec 27 '19 at 1:55
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    There's no limit because the grammar can always keep branching. You can have a rubber baby buggy bumper factory worker retirement policy meeting refreshment cart platter if you'd like. :) – tchrist Dec 27 '19 at 2:19
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    The "FC", "SC", and "DC" are abbreviations that presumably will be used in subsequent text. In some styles they would be presented in parentheses. – Hot Licks Dec 27 '19 at 2:20
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"Call" isn't a verb here; "is evaluated" and "is obtained" are the verbs.

A "function call" is a thing, in this case a procedure, which is either unchanging (static) or dynamic (changing, depending on conditions).

If I rewrite the sentence for clarity, I get something like this: "A function call (FC) can be evaluated in static (SC) or dynamic (DC) context. The instructions to perform this analysis are described next."

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Let me break down the following [given] sentence.

The sentence is: "When a static or dynamic function call FC is evaluated with respect to a static context SC and a dynamic context DC, the result is obtained as follows.". This sentence is quoted from 3.1.5.1 Evaluating Static and Dynamic Function Calls

Static or dynamic function call FC is the noun. is evaluated are helping/verbs

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