0

If I want to describe someone who has a great mind, or great mentality, describing him as a mental giant doesn't just seem right. Even though there isn't a comma between mental & giant, it may be misunderstood as calling someone mental & a giant.

Is there a better adjective which can be used here?

4
  • 1
    "Mental giant" is understood to be referring to exceptional intelligence, but the problem is the expression is often used sarcastically. So I would not use it, but not for the reason you gave.
    – nnnnnn
    Dec 23 '19 at 4:27
  • 1
    Intellectual giant? Dec 23 '19 at 9:06
  • Creative shouldn't be a bad option.
    – Ram Pillai
    Dec 24 '19 at 2:51
  • But, are the words, mental giant, or intellectual always positive? Even 'creative' is not. Since '...without negative connotations' is quite relative, it may be difficult to answer too.
    – Ram Pillai
    Dec 24 '19 at 6:05
2

Alternatives for mental in the sense of relating to the brain and mental capabilities would include:

  • an intellectual giant
  • a cognitive giant (this is a bit weird)
  • a cerebral giant

but you're probably better of going with the other suggestions and ditching giant for something that better matches what you're aiming at.

1
  • I like Cerebral Giant.
    – user93353
    Dec 24 '19 at 4:39
2

Seems to me the problem is the noun "giant." If you're emphasizing the mental capability, then make that concept the noun and modify accordingly. Some examples:

  • Brilliant mind (simple phasing, often the best way to go)
  • Gigantic brain (adhering to the original as much as possible)
  • Deep intellect (similar to "towering intellect," a cliché, which can be understood as sarcastic)
  • Cognitive wizard (emphasizes the magical)
  • Perspicacious frontal lobe (ok, now I've gone too far)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.