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Hello everybody I am an enthusiastic English learner and I would like to ask a question about noun clauses. Knowing the fact that noun clauses are group of words that take place as a noun in sentences I still feel indecisive about the following usages.

The error is resulting from that the information is not returned correctly.

The part

that the information is not returned correctly

is a noun clause, and what I initially thought was that I can use this like a noun in a sentence. However, after a bit of a search I have not encountered any example like this. Another example can be :

We are talking about that he is not as hardworking as Clara.

But the following sounds more correct :

We are talking about the fact that he is not as hardworking as Clara

Are the above sentences correct ? If not what is the part that I am misunderstanding here ? Thank you all for your time.

  • You have to say either the fact that the information is not returned correctly or the information not being returned correctly. – Kate Bunting Dec 10 '19 at 13:13
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//The error is resulting from that the information is not returned correctly.//

It's a little confusing. It should be "The error is resulting (The error results) from the fact that the information is not returned correctly."

But here,"the fact that the information is not returned correctly" is an adjective clause, qualifying the noun 'the fact'. What suits here is a noun phrase, like "The error is resulting (The error results) from the information not returning correctly."

Noun clause is, say: That the information is not returned correctly leads to the error. Here, "That the information is not returned...' is a noun clause.

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You need to subdivide "noun phrase" further. There are different sorts of noun phrases, and not all can occur in all contexts.

A that clause can occur as the complement of certain verbs (eg think, see, hope, insist) and adjectives (eg certain) but it can't occur as the complement of prepositions such as from or about.

[I believe that recent theories don't count that clauses as being noun phrases at all, but something else].

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  • It's the right season for traditional explanations. – Edwin Ashworth Dec 10 '19 at 15:10

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