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My diploma certificate contains following sentence:

Graduation from of full-time first-cycle degree programme

It obviously is a mistake, however I can't believe an official institution could make such a mistake, therefore I wanted to ask you if by any chance this is some archaic form or what ever that could explain this? I Googled "graduate from of" and nothing pops up.

To show the whole picture, it looks like this:

                       DIPLOMA
                       No. xxxxxx
      graduation from of full-time first-cycle degree programme
                      Name Surname

Some more details like date of birth, place of birth, subject etc.
  • That is not a "sentence" at all. It no verb. If there is more (before or after) then maybe we can answer whether it makes sense. – GEdgar Dec 9 '19 at 13:17
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    You my not have found "gratuate from of" but I did find "graduation from of" on the internet. Those seem also to be faulty to me; but if so, why does it occur multiple places? – GEdgar Dec 9 '19 at 13:20
  • @GEdgar i edited the question to show how it's written. I can't find any results for "graduation from of". – Alex Dec 9 '19 at 13:25
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    "But thou, Bethlehem Ephratah, though thou be little among the thousands of Judah, yet out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be ruler in Israel; whose goings forth have been from of old, from everlasting." en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micah_%28prophet%29 – Kris Dec 9 '19 at 13:46
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    "Of old" is an idiom. "Of full-time" is not. – Hot Licks Dec 9 '19 at 18:14
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This is not correct English. I believe the intended phrase is:

graduation from a full-time, first-cycle degree programme

Whoever wrote it misheard "a full" as "of full".

This kind of error is not uncommon when using computer dictation software.

| improve this answer | |
  • It may also be a result of hypercorrection as 'of' tends to be spelled as 'a' in non-standard English ('cuppa milk'). – Jules Cocovin May 8 at 12:32

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