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I am looking for a word (verb preferable, other constructions welcome) or short phrase that's similar to "Take to the Extreme", with a connotation of a logical conclusion, but avoiding stating that the conclusion has been rigorously inferred.

For example, consider the following passage: "Many patrons of our restaurant enjoy the southwest chicken sandwich, but we'd like to improve upon it. Without exception, they say that the chicken in the salad is what makes it tasty. Therefore, I propose we _________ this feedback and serve the chicken as its own dish!"

In this scenario, assume that replacing the sandwich menu item with its chicken component is the most drastic action that can be taken that has some root in the feedback given by the patrons. Serving chicken on its own could be good or bad, i.e it is a conclusion that is not unassailable (maybe the feedback is from a bad sample of patrons, etc). Therefore "take this feedback to its logical conclusion" doesn't quite work. "Take this feedback to the extreme" works to an extent, but I am wondering if there are alternatives. I'd like to make sure I'm conveying that the action is a reasonable thing to try.

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An obvious choice is build on, two orthographic words but considered a single lexeme ('phrasal verb' in their terms) by Cambridge Dictionary:

build on something — phrasal verb with build as [the related simplex] verb ...

to use a success or achievement as a base from which to achieve more success:

We must build on our reputation to expand the business.

Though I can't really envisage Chicken Extreme.

And go the whole hog doesn't really work here.

'Respond to' would work in the context you give, but is too general.

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incorporate

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/incorporate

It doesn't have the connotation of being extreme, and indicates that the feedback might be reasonable.

test

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/test

If you really want to get across that you're uncertain about the outcome of following the feedback, you would want to test it. Maybe it passes, maybe it fails, but you won't know unless you test it.

A single word that indicates that following the feedback is extreme eludes me at the moment (though serving chicken alone doesn't seem extreme in the slightest!), so hopefully someone else can chime in there.

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