1

We have something called dhikr in Islam.

We repeat the same word hundreds or thousands of times, e.g.

Subhanallah subhanallah subhanallah subhanallah subhanallah subhanallah subhanallah subhanallah subhanallah

(It means far from any imperfection is Allah?).

Also,

la ilahe ilallah la ilahe ilallah la ilahe ilallah la lilahe ilallah la ilahe ilallah

(There is no deity worthy of worship other than Allah).

My question is: if I write in a notebook or format pages one hundred or one thousands of this words repeatedly one after the other example subhanallah subhanallah subhanallah subhanallah..... until I reach the number one hundred or one thousand. What punctuation mark should I place between subhanallah subhanallah subhanallah subhanallah or la ilahe ilallah la ilahe ilallah la ilahe ilallah?

Should I place a comma like this

subhanallah, subhanallah, subhanallah, subhanallah

or a period like below ?

subhanallah. subhanallah. subhanallah. subhanallah. subhanallah. subhanallah. subhanallah. subhanallah. la ilahe ilallah. la ilahe ilallah. la ilahe ilallah. la ilahe ilallah. la ilahe ilallah. la ilahe ilallah. la ilahe ilallah

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    This doesn't appear to be a question about the English Language or its usage. – KillingTime Nov 28 '19 at 9:00
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    This Q belongs on Writing – Kris Nov 28 '19 at 10:21
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    This has rarely if ever cropped up in everyday English, Ibrahim, so no standard practice has been invented / established. To format, something like 'Try, try, try ... (to a total of 100)' might be used, but this might be considered disrespectful here. I'd use the comma-and-space myself if forced to come up with a solution, and make sure I had say 10 words a line, with identical lines, for (an attempt at!) ease of reading. But this essentially boils down to a style choice for those concerned only with the nuts and bolts of lovable old English. Perhaps you could ask a religious leader what ... – Edwin Ashworth Nov 28 '19 at 10:28
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    they would consider a respectful approach. – Edwin Ashworth Nov 28 '19 at 10:28
0

Chicago Manual of Style (13th ed) says in section 5.56:

For ease of reading, it is sometimes desirable to separate two identical or closely similar words with a comma, even though the sense or grammatical construction does not require such separation.

  • 1
    That's a valuable reference, Rajah. I've snaffled it. But I don't think they envisaged 100 identical words being juxtaposed. – Edwin Ashworth Nov 28 '19 at 13:00

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