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If I am going to a place named Coco (it's a bubble tea place), do I say I am going to Coco, or I am going to Coco's?

What is the use of the possessive term if it's a place?

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  • Coco's means a place (usually a house or a restaurant) belonging to a person named Coco. – Anton Sherwood Nov 25 '19 at 21:41
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Either can be used colloquially, particularly if Coco (in your example) is someone's name. It's fairly common in casual speech to call a place named Tio Pepe as "Pepe's," or a pub named J. McCarthy as "McCarthy's."

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Coco's would mean that the owner is named (or nicknamed) Coco. If the shop's sign says only Coco or Coco Bubble Tea, then I'd say to Coco.

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If it's called Coco's, then you can just say, "I'm going to Coco's."
If it's called Coco and you want to say Coco's, then you should use a specifier, as in Coco's place, Coco's restaurant or Coco's cafe.

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