2

"Not that I heard of."

I understand its meaning, but It sounds like a somewhat shortened form of a full sentence. Am I wrong?

3
  • 1
    It is shortened from "It's not that I heard of.", but it can be used (and is normally used) without first part. Nov 23, 2019 at 9:19
  • 3
    It's short for "It's not something that I've heard of"
    – Barmar
    Nov 23, 2019 at 9:21
  • A minimal change to make it a full sentence, with the same meaning, is to replace “Not” with “There is no such thing” or “It never happened”. Nov 25, 2019 at 20:11

2 Answers 2

2

This is a common idiomatic turn; there is a similar one, "not that I know of" that is used in a similar context but much more frequently (ngram). Apparently, "not that I've heard of" is not used (ngram).

This turn is used in answer to a question. You can consider it to be the shortening of anything that makes sense. For instance, in the dialogue below there are at least four options you can use instead.

  • Att.Gen. Was there any discourse at that time Mr Coote?
    Pomfret Not that I heard of, one word.

  • Not any discourse that I heard of, one word.
    Not any that I heard of, one word.
    There was not any discourse that I heard of, one word.
    There was not any that I heard of, one word.

Most often, when you can use "not that I heard of", "not that I know of" can be used in its place.

1

It's a fragment suggesting a response to an interrogative. The right forms are "not that I've heard of" or "not that I know of".

1

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.