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"He remembered the red priest Thoros of Myr, and the flaming sword he had wielded in the melee.The man had made for a colorful spectacle, his red robes flapping while his blade writhed with pale green flames, but everyone knew there was no true magic to it, and in the end his fire had guttered out and Bronze Yohn Royce had brained him with a common mace."

Why it isn't written like the following.

He remembered the red priest Thoros of Myr, and the flaming sword he wielded in the melee. The man made for a colorful spectacle, his red robes flapping while his blade writhed with pale green flames, but everyone knew there was no true magic to it, and in the end his fire guttered out and Bronze Yohn Toyce brained him with a common mace.

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    Probably to set this event before one mentioned previously. The previous context needs to be added. – Edwin Ashworth Nov 10 '19 at 15:06
  • Sounds as if you are reading rubbish that is no concern of anyone interested in the English language. – David Nov 10 '19 at 20:24
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    And your grounds for that sweeping statement, @David? The passage in question seems to be clear, grammatical English, with clear visual description. The word brained at first seemed possibly out of place, but my assumption was that this was a deliberate piece of bathos, for sarcastic effect. How is that "of no concern to anyone interested in the English language"? – Colin Fine Nov 10 '19 at 22:19
  • You'd have to ask George R. R. Martin for the definitive answer. – TaliesinMerlin Nov 13 '19 at 14:23
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Because the events described occurred before “He remembered”.

The passage could be written as you suggest, but I see no reason to prefer it.

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  • "but everyone knew there was no true magic to it". Then, the writer should have written this line with past perfect like the following "but everyone had known there had been no true magic to it" – SIddharth Singh Nov 11 '19 at 8:46
  • I did not notice that. Well, the knowing had not ended. – Anton Sherwood Nov 11 '19 at 16:51
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Well, he remembered something.

For instance, if I say "I remember what happened yesterday." The word "remember" is in the present, whereas the word "happened" is in the past tense. Similarly, you would say "Yesterday, I remembered what had happened two days ago."

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