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I have the text in one mathematical book:

It certainly is a huge step beyond just the concept of evenness and oddness, which is all that the Pythagorean proof uses.

Can you explain to me what is "just" - adjective or adverb? And what does "just" mean here? I've looked some dictionary but can't choose proper meaning.

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In this sentence, 'just' means the same as 'simply' or 'merely', and is an adverb. The text is saying that the Pythagorean theorem only uses concepts of evenness and oddness, but 'it' (whatever 'it' refers to) is more advanced than that.

Oxford English Dictionary: 'just' (adverb):

  1. Used to place the focus on a particular word or phrase. a. No less than; absolutely; actually, positively, really. In weakened sense: neither more nor less than, no other than; simply, merely.
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  • Can I change location of "just" and say: "It certainly just is a huge step beyond the concept of evenness and oddness, which is all that the Pythagorean proof uses."? Is the meaning changing with that?
    – ZWA
    Commented Nov 4, 2019 at 16:52
  • I don't think the new sentence is grammatically correct. The 'just' in the original sentence qualifies the concept of evenness, whereas in the new sentence (even if it were grammatically correct, which I doubt), the use of 'just', I think, will relate to 'huge step'. Commented Nov 4, 2019 at 16:57
  • @ZWA Relocating just that way is grammatical but changes the meaning.
    – Lawrence
    Commented Nov 4, 2019 at 17:21

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