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I could use "one more tool in my toolbox" to describe a final addition to the various methods I have for doing something. However, I'm not sure about "tool" occuring twice in such a short phrase. "One more arrow in my quiver" sounds a bit weird. "One more weapon in my arsenal/armoury" sound too martial. Is there a more elegant formulation along the lines of needing "one more" something or other in "my something or other"?

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The ability to tap dance is "...just another tool in my toolbox." meaning that you are highly qualified and it's no big deal, it is just one of the many skill you posses. You can swop between different tools to get the job done.

An alternative could be

[having] another string to one's bow

which refers to the bow string of a [long]bow and arrow, that is, I have another string, so if the original one breaks, I can easily replace it with another and keep on shooting arrows [probably] at Agincourt.

If you need to acquire an additional skill, you could say: "I need another string to my bow." Meaning that if you cannot do that one thing [usually relating to employment] you cannot work and earn money.

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  • Here's a reference to Cambridge dictionaries for "string to my bow", which suggests it can be used whether you have few or many other skills. I agree it's a good phrase. dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/… – Stuart F Oct 31 '19 at 10:24
  • Yes, 'String to my bow' is not dependent upon the number of skills you already have, it's just saying, "I'm going to add one more." A Novice may only have a single skill, a Grand Master or Expert may have many; both can always add another string to their bow. – NeilB Oct 31 '19 at 10:34
  • The definitive answer, but do add a reference. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 31 '19 at 10:38
  • Maybe I'm being too picky and should just stick to tools in my toolbox. – Peter4075 Oct 31 '19 at 10:54
  • No I don't think so - "Horses for courses..." – NeilB Oct 31 '19 at 20:57

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