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I want to express that there are clear differences in salaries between two cities, but if we look at the salaries in one city taken by itself, there is already an important insight. Checking the internet I could not find anything on how to express taken by itself or alone in plural.

Some ideas:

While salaries between New York and Washington are clearly different, salaries in New York have an extremely high fixed rate by themselves.

While salaries between New York and Washington are clearly different, salaries in New York alone have an extremely high fixed rate.

While salaries between New York and Washington are clearly different, salaries in New York have an extremely high fixed rate taken by themselves.

While salaries between New York and Washington are clearly different, salaries only in New York have an extremely high fixed rate.

Which sounds best/which is right?

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  • "salaries only in New York" is my favorite. It is concise and clear.
    – Steve
    Oct 29, 2019 at 21:55
  • It probably doesn't make sense to say that salaries in New York are "high" unless you're comparing them to salaries in other places, or to cost of living, or to historical salaries, or something like that.
    – Juhasz
    Oct 29, 2019 at 23:34
  • @Juhasz fair, but I am more concerned about the grammar here than the content
    – User878239
    Oct 30, 2019 at 11:07
  • short follow-up question: is "by themselves" generally incorrect? I mean as the plural to "by itself", which according to a dictionary can be used to refer to "seen individually".
    – User878239
    Oct 31, 2019 at 22:20

1 Answer 1

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"While salary rates in New York and Washington are clearly different, when considered in isolation, salaries in New York are extremely high."

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