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Here's the conversation I was having with a guy:

So, in this context, f I drill down, from my perspective, they may not mean anything together.

Can you please help me figure out what his expression of words or facts could actually mean?

  • It seems to me that you have a playwright for a friend. – Aravind Suresh Nov 21 '19 at 12:35
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He is saying that without anything to pursue, life is pointless/unexciting/finished. Just imagine it: all your wishes have suddenly come true. What do you have left to strive for?

  • @user42527 that depends, do you agree with him or not? If it were me though, I'd want to poke fun at him, so I'd say something like "Don't worry, I'm sure you'll be busy for a long time." (Basically it says that his wishes will never be fulfilled.) – Marcus Hendriksen Oct 22 '19 at 11:50
  • "To fear something" is often used for dramatic effect in English. As for "I fear the finality of life", you have to consider it in context. The complete statement is "I fear the finality of life without wishes." Since you can't have a life without anything if... you know... you're not alive, he can't be talking about dying prematurely. – Marcus Hendriksen Oct 22 '19 at 12:21
  • Ah yes, exactly, so in that context it becomes a million times more likely that he is indeed talking about dying with unfulfilled wishes. However, there is his use of the word "should". He said "Maybe not all of my wishes should come true..." contrast this with "Maybe not all of my wishes will come true..." Do you see the difference? "Should" implies that that it is necessary that not all of his wishes come true, whereas "will" expresses the fear that random circumstances will cause them not to come true. – Marcus Hendriksen Oct 22 '19 at 12:54
  • Of course, since he's not a native English speaker, that could just be a lexical error, in which case I would bet good money on your interpretation being the right one (not that I actually would!) – Marcus Hendriksen Oct 22 '19 at 12:56
  • Then again the bit he added after that does back up my original interpretation. I am basing this statement on "So the shortness of life could also be a bless, something good as it will always push us forward, seeking to fulfill all these dreams..." If you then take what he said earlier ("Maybe not all of my wishes should come true") and consider them together, it would mean that his wishes should not come true as the shortness of life would lose its goodness and meaning. – Marcus Hendriksen Oct 22 '19 at 13:01

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