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Cara’s mother berated her in front of the entire basketball team, which was especially humiliating because everyone was talking about it the next morning.

Is the relative clause ‘which was especially humiliating because everyone was talking about it the next morning’ modifying the independent clause ‘Cara’s mother berated her in front of the entire basketball team’?

  • Don't you have any idea at all? – BillJ Oct 16 '19 at 14:04
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    You'll need to give us a hint of what about it is giving you problems. – Colin Fine Oct 16 '19 at 14:25
  • What part of it do you find hard to parse? – Kris Oct 16 '19 at 15:07
  • The "relative clause" starting with which refers back to the entire preceding statement - more precisely, to the "fact" asserted in the earlier clause (the fact that Cara's mother berated her in front of the entire basketball team). That fact / act was humiliating, because of the reason as specified. It would be conceptually the same if you ended that first assertion with a period, and started the next one with This (fact / act) was humiliating... – FumbleFingers Oct 16 '19 at 16:13
  • Thanks fumblefingers22 – Opel Oct 17 '19 at 15:01
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One way to parse is to rearrange or separate clauses, and see events on a timeline. See if this helps:

1) Cara's mother berated her in front of the entire basketball team. 2) Everyone was talking about it the next morning. 3) That (#2) was especially humiliating (for Cara).

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