1

In Finnish, there is an idiom for taking everything from someone which translates roughly to "taking even the ashes from the stove". Is there an equivalent saying in English?

  • 1
    “Take everything from someone” in what sense? – user067531 Oct 7 at 14:45
3

They'd take the shirt of your back.

From the free dictionary

the shirt off (one's) back Anything or everything one owns or has to offer.
Those contractors will take the shirt off your back if you hire them. I mean, I paid them an exorbitant amount of money, and look at the shoddy work they did!
I'm not surprised that Tammy loaned you money—she would give you the shirt off her back if you needed it.

2

That phrase reminds me of this one ...

bleed (someone or something) dry.
To take all of the resources that another person or thing has available. This phrase is often applied to money.
Paying for my kids' education is just bleeding me dry. I hope I'll still be able to retire one day!
Overhead costs are bleeding our business dry. We need to come up with a different way of doing things.

https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/bleed+him+dry

1

Cleaned to the bone is one option.

Pacific hurricanes usually breakup over the southern Baja California peninsula and then head north up to Phoenix where they have their annual 'monsoon season.' But that year, the hurricane remnants were following the coast of Baja California and ending up in San Diego. The portable AC shelves in both Costco and Home Depot were cleaned to the bone.

Read more: http://www.city-data.com/forum/san-diego/2921804-may-gray-june-gloom.html#ixzz61hmSAcOi

1

There are many. Not yet mentioned:

Wiped him out

Cleaned him out

Him can be replaced by any object pronoun (her, them, us, you).

0

there's also a nice phrase which is not about stealing money or property but about stealing ideas, praise etc

steal sb's thunder

  • I'm not sure anyone would take steal someone's thunder as meaning taking everything from them, even if limited to an intellectual level. – KillingTime Oct 29 at 9:18
  • Sure it doesn't have the connotation of 'everything' but it has a similar meaning to stealing the spotlight and to someone that spotlight might be everything – Sam Ogra Oct 29 at 14:29

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