-1

I will be on leave starting on October 4th till October 5th

I will be on leave on October 4th and 5th

I am on leave from October 4th till October 5th

  • 1
    In my opinion "starting on" and "till" don't really go together so I wouldn't use option 1. The phrasing "on leave from X till Y" can be misinterpreted to mean that Y will be your first day back at work, so I wouldn't use option 3 without adding "(inclusive)". Also phrasing it as a range from one date to another sounds odd to me when you're talking about only two days in total. Option 2 sounds most natural to me. – nnnnnn Oct 1 '19 at 10:59
  • Welcome to ELU. Start with reading the FAQ here: english.stackexchange.com/help/asking Good Luck. – Kris Oct 1 '19 at 11:11
  • Are we can use 'on' two times in this sentence " I will be on leave on October 4th and 5th" – john Oct 1 '19 at 11:40
  • Nothing wrong with using "on" twice in the same sentence. (In any case I would say that's a matter of style, not grammar.) – nnnnnn Oct 1 '19 at 14:49
1

Your second option most clearly states when you'll be on leave. Saying "till" doesn't make it clear if you're returning the morning of the 5th, or if the 5th is included in your leave.

To be absolutely clear, you should state when you leave and when you return.

I will be on leave October 4th and 5th, and I will return October 6th.

This makes it clear which days you will not be in the office.

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