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If you'd use a preposition after the pattern "to do research...", what would be all the potential prepositions that could come after?

Edit: I'm speaking about researching something of a little value, not a social subject or a scientific matter or anything, more like a research (insert preposition here) new pc games or online products.

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    Nobody says "a research". It is a mass noun. That is a common error coming from L1-L2 interference. – Cascabel Sep 27 '19 at 17:44
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    We don't do a research in English ... we do research on or into a topic, or simply research a topic. – StoneyB on hiatus Sep 27 '19 at 17:44
  • @Cascabel Thanks, corrected. – Enthusiastor Sep 27 '19 at 17:56
  • I can do research:into technology; in a matter of minutes; to the beat of a drum; for the government; down to the last detail; with a glad heart; between lunch and dinner; and many many more. You will have to be a bit more specific about what you want. – DJClayworth Sep 27 '19 at 17:56
  • What if I'm talking about something of a much smaller value? Like, I need to have a list of prices for all the cotton t-shirts sold online and I need someone to research that, but I need a preposition. – Enthusiastor Sep 27 '19 at 18:00
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The noun research is followed by the preposition in when the object of the preposition is a field of research, for example:

The professor was renowned for her research in biology.

Possible prepositions include (each of them have a different meaning):

  • to do research in/into biology
  • to do research for biology
  • to do research before biology
  • to do research about biology
  • to do research throughout biology

These are just some common prepositions (they all have different meanings), a list of the top 50 can be viewed here.

With the edit

I'm speaking about researching something of a little value, not a social subject or a scientific matter or anything, more like a research (insert preposition here) new pc games or online products.

You could use:

  • to do research in/into PC games
  • to do research about PC games
  • "to do research of biology" is incorrect. You could do research 'of the highest quality", but not that. – DJClayworth Sep 27 '19 at 17:59
  • @DJClayworth i was thinking it sounded a bit off, removed it – user325641 Sep 27 '19 at 17:59
  • ...and you really should point out that they don't all mean the same. To do research before biology is to do some before I take my biology class. – DJClayworth Sep 27 '19 at 18:00
  • @DJClayworth edited post – user325641 Sep 27 '19 at 18:01
  • What about "to do research about biology" here, what does it mean? Does it mean the same as when "in/into" are used? – Enthusiastor Sep 27 '19 at 18:11
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Here is a non-exhaustive list of prepositions that follow research, based on a Corpus of Contemporary American English search for "research" followed by a preposition. The general impression should be that, if you can think of a preposition, you can likely use it with research.

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Here's a further breakdown using the top relevant result in each of these entries. Little surprise that the preposition's meaning highly influences the resulting collocation:

  • research on his father's experience in the war (topic of research, here specific)

  • research in research in immunology and cell therapy (topic of research, here field- or subject-level)

  • research at the University of Manchester (place of research)

  • research into your opponent (topic of research)

  • research for clients / my book (audience or purpose of research)

  • research by a private-sector guy in Great Britain (author)

  • research with people that regularly eat hot dogs (study group or target)

  • research of GASe stability in air / Vaghi and colleagues (topic of research OR authors of research)

This list could keep on going for a while. Other prepositions to denote the topic of research include about, regarding, over, and concerning. You'll want to look up each collocation yourself to get a better idea of whether it's appropriate for your context.

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